The 1958 Awardees

Harold A. Kertz
Attorney, Professor
LLB 1928
Washington, DC

Harold Kertz, an attorney and adjunct professor at Georgetown Law School, received the John Carroll Award in ceremonies held at the Pittsburgh Athletic Club on April 19, 1958.

Born in Allentown, PA in 1907, Kertz enrolled directly into law school at Georgetown and received his degree in 1928, practicing law in the District soon thereafter. A trust officer for a number of local banks, Kertz was a former professor of wills and estate adminiatration at the law school, In 1958, at the time of his award, he was appointed by President Eisenhower to serve on the D.C. Public Utilities Commission, which he did until returning to private practice in 1962.

Kertz died in 1978 at the age of 71.


Clay F. Lynch
Business Executive
Attended 1899-1902, Honorary degree 1963
Greensburg PA
Clay Frick Lynch, part of Western Pennsylvania's most prominent mining company, received the John Carroll Award in ceremonies held at the Pittsburgh Athletic Club on April 19, 1958.

Lynch's father, Thomas Lynch, was the vice president of the H.C. Frick Coke Company, the largest producer of coke in the world and the company that fueled the Pittsburgh steel industry; when Thomas' son was born in 1880, he was named in honor of the company's president, industrialist Henry Clay Frick.

Clay Lynch attended Georgetown at least through 1902, and was listed as baving been elected President of the Yard (Athletic Association) , but is not listed on the degree recipients of 1903, suggesting he returned to Pittsburgh to join the coke business, rising to company superintendent. His father died in 1914, Frick in 1919, and by that time the coke business had changed and the Frick processing technology fell out of favor. Lynch served as vice president of the company until retiring in 1939.

In addition to the John Carroll award, Lynch was honored with an honorary degree in 1963 and the University's 175th Anniversary medal. Upon Lynch's death in 1966, the estate had bequeathed Georgetown a sum of $100,000, among the largest gifts received to date.


Gen. Thomas W. Mattingly, MD
Physician
BS 1928, MD 1930
Washington DC

Thomas Mattingly, an Army cardiologist who treated Presidents Dwight Eisenhower and Lyndon Johnson, received the John Carroll Award in ceremonies held at the Pittsburgh Athletic Club on April 19, 1958.

Born in 1907 in Charles County, Maryland, Mattingly received his bachelor's and medical degrees at Georgetown, and completed his residency at Georgetown University Hospital before joining the Army Medical Corps in 1934. In 1941, while stationed in Honolulu, HI, he survived the attack at Pearl Harbor and went became an executive officer in the Pacific Theater, leading the establishment of field hospitals in the South Pacific. He later received the Bronze Star for his actions in battle.

Following the war, Mattingly returned to Washington to become the chief cardiologist at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and was summoned to Denver following a major heart attack suffered by President Eisenhower on Sept. 24, 1955. Working alongside Dr. Paul Dudley White, Mattingly and the team stabilized the president and focused on a low cholesterol diet to avoid further issues. While Eisenhower had continued heart issues in the intervening years, the diagnosis changed the way heart issues were discussed by the general public.

Dr. Mattingly retired as a brigadier general in 1958, but continued to practice in the Washington area into the 1980's, and served as an expert on cardiovascular surgery. he was a member of the American College of Physicians, the American College of Cardiology, and the National Heart Institute.

Thomas Mattingly died in 1999 at the age of 92, and is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.


Dr. Thomas F. Quinn
Physician
MD 1939
Silver Spring, MD

Dr. Thomas Quinn, a medical alumni volunteer and Washington area physician, received the John Carroll Award in ceremonies held at the Pittsburgh Athletic Club on April 19, 1958.

Born in 1914, Quinn received his undergraduate degree from Mount St. Mary's Colelge before pursuing his medical degree from Georgetown in 1939. Following residency, he established a practice in Silver Spring in 1942 and joined the staff at Holy Cross Hospital in 1963.

Dr. Quinn died in 1987 at the age of 73.


Alfred D. Reid
Architect
AB 1921
Pittsburgh, PA

Alfred Reid, the architect who designed the Georgetown University Hospital in 1947, received the John Carroll Award in ceremonies held at the Pittsburgh Athletic Club on April 19, 1958.
Redid arrived to Georgetown from Pittsburgh in the fall of 1917, where he was active across numerous campus groups, including the Philodemic Society, College Joutnal, and The HOYA, where he designed the script nameplate that was featured on the paper's front page from 1920 through 1979. Following his Georgetown degree, he studied at the University of Pennsylvania and received a bachelor's in architecture from Carnegie Tech in 1925.

The owner of Alfred D. Reid Associates, he led architecture projects for a number of hospital projects over the years, including the construction of Georgetown University Hospital in 1947. The firm received an architectural award from the American Institute of Steel Construction for the design of a 1960 addition to Children's Hospital in Pittsburgh.

In his later years, Reid also served as a lecturer at Carnegie-Mellon University .He died in 1983 at the age of 84.


Joseph G. Smith
Business Executive
AB 1933
Pittsburgh, PA

Joseph Smith, vice president of the Pittsburgh Steel Company , received the John Carroll Award in ceremonies held at the Pittsburgh Athletic Club on April 19, 1958.

A native of Pittsburgh, Smith served as president of the Philodemic Society, managing editor of The HOYA, and president of the short-lived Robert Walsh Literary Academy during his years on the Hilltop. he served his entire business career in the steel industry, and retired with the merged Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporation in 1972. He was an active member of the local Catholic community and served on many civic and philanthropic boards.

Following his business career, Joseph Smith served as president of the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania from 1972 until his death in 1977 at the age of 66.