The 1967 Awardees

Col. John R. Crown
Government Official
BSFS 1929
Washington DC

John R. Crown, former vice president of the United States Export-Import Bank, received the John Carroll Award in ceremonies held at the Missouri Athletic Club in St. Louis, MO on October 21, 1967.

Born in New York and raised in Washington, DC, Crown studied at Gonzaga College high School before entering the School of Foreign Service in 1925, receiving his degree in 1929. He worked in the civil service from 1935 to his retirement in 1968, the last 22 of which were with the Export-Import Bank, and was a colonel in the U.S. Army reserves.

Crown was a vice-president of the Board of Governors of the Georgetown University Alumni Association from 1958-1959 and a past president of the Georgetown Club of Metropolitan Washington.

John Crown died in 1982 at the age of 74.


Charles S. Lamy
Business Executive
AB 1928
St. Louis, MO

Charles Lamy, an investment broker based in St. Louis, received the John Carroll Award in ceremonies held at the Missouri Athletic Club in St. Louis, MO on October 21, 1967.

The invitation to the 1967 dinner provided a description of Mr. Lamy's various charitable pursuits: "He is past president of the Lay Advisory Board of St. Vincent's Hospital and St. Louis Archdiocese Catholic Charities...and serves both as a board member and vice-president of the St. Louis Health and Welfare Council and as a member of the Agency Relations Committee of the United Fund of Greater St. Louis."


Louis A. Langie
Business Executive
AB 1919
Rochester, NY
Louis Langie, retired chairman of the Langie Fuel Service Company, received the John Carroll Award in ceremonies held at the Missouri Athletic Club in St. Louis, MO on October 21, 1967.

Langie earned degrees from Georgetown and Columbia law with interests in becoming an attorney, but became the third generation of his family to lead a local coal and fuel oil business which reached its peak under Langie. He served in leadership positions among numerous local civic organizations, including the Boy Scouts, Rochester Chamber of Commerce and the Rochester Hospital Council. He served as the national chairman of the Alumni Annual Fund in 1954-1955 and completed a three year term on the Board of Governors of the Georgetown University Alumni Association from 1963 to 1966.

Louis Langie died in 1971 at the age of 74.


Dr. Adrian J. Levesque DDS
Dentist, Alumni Volunteer
DDS 1933
Nashua, NH

Dr. Adrian Levesque, dentist and longtime member of the Board of Governors of the Georgetown University Alumni Association, received the John Carroll Award in ceremonies held at the Missouri Athletic Club in St. Louis, MO on October 21, 1967.

Dr. Levesque practiced dentistry in Nashua for 57 years until his death in 1990, with leadership in many dental associations in the region. The founder of the Georgetown Club of new Hampshire, he served on the dean's advisory council of the School of Dentistry and as vice president of the Georgetown University Alumni Association.


Eugene L. Stewart
Attorney, Professor, Alumni Volunteer
BSS 1948, LLB 1951
Washington DC

Eugene Stewart, a prominent Washington attorney and former president of the Georgetown University Alumni Association, received the John Carroll Award in ceremonies held at the Missouri Athletic Club in St. Louis, MO on October 21, 1967.

"Born in Kansas City in 1920, he graduated from high school at 16," writes a web page at his former firm dedicated to his memory. " He was involved with just-in-time delivery for an auto assembly plant in the Midwest before enlisting in the Army Air Force in World War II, rising to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. After the war, he pursued his education at Georgetown University and Georgetown Law School, clerking by day for the U.S. Court of Customs and Patent Appeals. Eugene Stewart was active for many years as a Georgetown alumnus, serving as president of the National Alumni Association, as national chairman of the annual giving fund drive, and in other high-profile capacities."

Stewart was a nationally known figure in the area of international trade law, and his law firm, Stewart & Stewart, found themselves in the midst of numerous international law issues.

Stewart's volunteer service to Georgetown was legendary.

He served on the Board of Governors of the Alumni Association and the Dean's Council of the Law School, having served as a professor at the law school for many years. From 1964 to 1966, he was president of the Alumni Association, and developed the Board of Governors into the working board it is today.

Stewart was also deeply committed to his faith and the needs of the working poor. In 1966, he proposed the construction of a cooperative low-income housing community near Gonzaga College High School known as Sursum Corda, and asked the Alumni Association to help build it. When the Alumni Association voted the proposal down, Stewart offered to resign on the spot, but the board declined his resignation. Instead, he founded a non-profit corporation to complete the work. The firm's web site tells its story:

"The units included amenities such as washers and dryers and air conditioning for convenience and comfort. A library where tutoring services were offered, an activity and social center, and open spaces fostered a sense of community and individual pride and development. Throughout his 20-year stewardship, when social ills threatened the integrity and quality of the community, Stewart regularly devoted his own time and resources to combat crime, vandalism, and other challenges in order to give meaning to the term and residents of Sursum Corda."

A decade following his passing in 1998 at the age of 78, prominent alumnus and 1966 John Carroll award recipient Richard McCooey (C'52) spoke of Stewart to an interviewer who may not have been familiar with his name. McCooey introduced him simply as "Eugene L. Stewart, the finest graduate Georgetown has ever put forward."